Friday, June 8, 2018

Sure Could Have Fooled Me!

Both teams that made the NHL playoffs in 1917/18 had goalies for whom awards were named after.

Now, I knew about George Vezina, but I was a little surprised when I found out that the Toronto Arenas in 1917/18 had goalie Hap Holmes. He, too, had an award named after him.

Holmes had been in hockey since 1912. He enjoyed success with many Toronto teams. With the Blues in 1913/14, he got his name on the Stanley Cup for the first time. Playoff success followed him around. In 1917, he was part of the first American team to win the Stanley Cup, the Seattle Metropolitans. The following year was the NHL's first, and Holmes was back in Toronto on the Arenas. Hap would win it all again.

Holmes' totals don't look good: 9 wins and a 4.73 GAA, but he was second in the National Hockey League in both categories. How about the playoffs? Well, all Holmes did was take Toronto to a Stanley Cup. Though Toronto and Montreal split two games in the playoffs, the Arenas were the winners due to the "Total goals" rule of the time. The Cup was not won with that, however, as Toronto then needed to beat the Vancouver Millionaires of the Pacific Coast Hockey League. So the quest for Lord Stanley came down to a best-of-five series. In the deciding fifth contest, it was Holmes emerging with a 2-1 win for his team, and once again, another Stanley Cup for Hap.

Hap continued on winning. In fact, had the Stanley Cup finals not been called off the next year due to the Spanish Flu, Holmes might have had another ring. By this time he was back with Seattle. Following the PCHA merger with the Western Canada Hockey League in 1924, Hap was now on the Victoria Cougars. And guess what? He won the Stanley Cup that year, as his team beat the Montreal Canadians in the finals. The same goalie that had been on Montreal when they faced Holmes' Toronto Arenas was there again in 1925: George Vezina!

Vezina had taken the Habs all the way in 1915/16, beating the Portland Rosebuds of the PCHA in the Stanley Cup finals. George's team had to endure second best the following season, as his old pal Holmes and Seattle beat them in the finals. Following a playoff loss to Toronto in the first NHL season (1917/18), George became a true star in the Montreal net. He'd play every game. He'd stop every puck (Seemingly). And Vezina's team would make the playoffs (The goalies of today that win the award in his honour usually play on teams that do, too!), where he'd be light out.

George led the NHL in playoff games won for five years in a row beginning in 1918. In 1924 and 1925, he'd win the Cup back-to-back. Sadly, he was a tired old man when he stepped into the crease for the last time the following season, on November 28th. Facing the Pittsburgh Pirates, George didn't allow a goal in the first period, but was replaced by Alphonse Lacroix to start the second. The great netminder had tried to continue in the second stanza but had collapsed. As it turns out, he'd developed tuberculosis. It would claim Vezina's life the following March.

But neither left without an award being named in their honour. Holmes got one for the top goalie in the American League. In 1972 Hap was inducted into the Hockey Hall Of Fame. Vezina made it the first year the Hall Of Fame opened, in 1945. But what about his trophy? It's awarded to the NHL's top goalie. Originally, up until 1945/46, it was for the goalie with the lowest goals-against-average. From 1945/46 to 1980/81, it was merely awarded to the goalie (Or goalies) on the team that allowed the fewest regular season goals (Minimum 25 GP). But not matter what it is awarded for, it was the individual trophy all netminders wanted to win.


"The information used herein was obtained free of charge from and is copyrighted by The Hockey Summary Project. For more information about the Hockey Summary Project please visit:

http://hsp.flyershistory.com

or

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/hockey_summary_project/"


References


Anson, Peter. “Hockey Summary Project.” Hockey Summary Project, 08 Jun. 2018, <hsp.flyershistory.com/>.

Diamond, Dan. Total NHL: The Ultimate Source On The National Hockey League. Triumph Books, 2003.

Fischler, Stan, and Andrew Schneider. The All-New Hockey's 100: A Personal Ranking Of The Best Players In Hockey History. McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1988.

Hollander, Zander. The Hockey News Hockey Almanac 2000: The Complete Guide. Visible Ink Press, 2000.

Hughes, Morgan, and Stan Fischler. Hockey Chronicle: Year-By-Year History Of The National Hockey League. Publications International, Ltd., 2007.

“Official Site Of The National Hockey League.” NHL.com, National Hockey League, 8 June 2018, <www.nhl.com/>.

Podnieks, Andrew. The Toronto Maple Leafs Ultimate Book Of Facts, Stats, And Stories. McClelland & Stewart, 2015.

Sports Reference LLC.  Hockey-Reference.com - Hockey Statistics and History. http://www.hockey-reference.com/. Web. 08 Jun. 2018.

Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 08 Jun. 2018. <https://en.wikipedia.org>.

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Sure Could Have Fooled Me

Brayden Hotby didn't have a single shutout in the regular season in 2017/18. I guess he was saving those for when his team, the Washington Capitals, needed them most.

It was, for all intents and purposes, an off-season by Brayden's standards. Making what happened in the postseason all the more remarkable.

For all of his accomplishments, Holtby was very normal in the regular season. For starters, he played just 54 games (Backup Philipp Grubauer got into 35), posted a GAA of a 2.99 and a S% of only .907. No shutouts of course.

Now let's pause to consider Grubauer's #'s from this past season: Not only did he get, THREE shutouts, but also had FAR better GAA and S%! Would Holtby lose his job?

Philipp went only 15-10-3 in 28 starts, but that doesn't tell the story how effective he was. His GAA was just 2.35, good enough for 6th in the league. How about his .923 S%? It was just outside the top 10. But, within .010 of Carter Hutton's league-leading .931.

But what about what happened in the playoffs?

Well, the Washington Captials DID go with Grubauer. For two games. He was up against the Columbus Blue Jackets, and Washington to lose his first two starts at home, both in OT. But before he could even pick up a decision in game two, the Capitals went back to Holtby. And while he lost game two, he won his next four games as the Caps climbed off the canvas.

The second round series saw Washington face their nemesis Pittsburgh. Washington again had the home-ice advantage and this time, they had the Pens! After the smoke had cleared, the Capitals were heading to the conference finals with a six-game triumph over the two-time defending champions.

Well, Washington's luck seemed to have run out. Up against Tampa, Holtby slammed the door. 2 goals allowed in game 1. 2 goals allowed in game 2. And Washington was up 2-0 going home. Then, a groan as the Lighting proceeded to win the next three games.

Holtby made sure Washington didn't lose another game in the conference finals.

Picking a fine time to get his first shutout, it was Braden Holtby posting a 3-0 shutout in a do-or-die game six at home.



They still needed game seven on the road, of course. And Holtby picked up his second (straight) shutout of the postseason with a 4-0, series-clinching victory. Braden turned aside all 29 shots he faced.



So far in the Stanley Cup Finals, Holtby doesn't have a shutout. In fact, the Vegas Golden Knights got five past him in game one. Washington needed game two before returning home for the third and fourth contest. Again, no shutout. But a 3-2 win. Series tied. Back home, Holtby came close to a third shutout with a 3-1 win. I'm sure he's fine with that.


But who knows. The Stanley Cup is far from in the bag. Game five is in Las Vegas. But before that, there's the matter of game four, the crucial contest. I believe that Vegas will win game five, but if Washington can win game four at home it will put the Caps up 3-1.

The Capitals are still looking for that first Stanley Cup, having entered the NHL way back in 1974/75. The game two win in Vegas was the first game they'd ever won in the Stanley Cup Finals. Game three was the first game they've ever won at home in the Stanley Cup Finals. Twenty years ago, Washington was swept by Detroit in the finals. They've come a long way since with Alexander Ovechkin. If you can believe it, he's turning 33 in September.

No doubt, though, the key man is defending the crease for Washington. Will Holtby need a shutout in the finals? He very well could. The Capitals are, needless to say, in uncharted waters. Maybe they'll break down defensively. Maybe the offence will dry up. But, whose the guy that can "steal" you games, and not just in the playoffs? The goalie, of course. I'm sure Holtby won't mind getting a tough two more shutouts this postseason, knowing what that will me to him and the franchise!


References


“Official Site Of The National Hockey League.” NHL.com, National Hockey League. Web. 3 Jun. 2018, <www.nhl.com/>.

Sports Reference LLC.Hockey-Reference.com - Hockey Statistics and History. http://www.hockey-reference.com/. Web. 03 Jun. 2018.


Youtube. Web. 03 Jun. 2018. <https://www.youtube.com/>.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Common Denominator: Pittsburgh And Las Vegas!

"At one point in their careers, played for the Pittsburgh Penguins. Now, in 2018, on the Stanley Cup Finalist, Vegas Golden Knights."

The Golden Knights face off against the Capitals, with the extravaganza starting on May 28th. But the Knights have something up their sleeve: The have some former members of Washington's old nemesis, Pittsburgh.

For starters, let's look at Marc Andre Fleury and Ryan Reaves. Reaves was traded to Pittsburgh by St. Louis in the 2017 offseason. But 58 games into his tenure with the Penguins, it was adios to Ryan. He went west to the Golden Knights.

Fleury was exposed in the expansion draft of 2017. The goalie got Pittsburgh through the first two rounds in their Stanley Cup-winning season of 2016/17. Matt Murray took over in the Eastern Conference Finals against Ottawa. The Pens didn't use Fleury past game 3, there. But he's sure helped Vegas. Fleury also has a 2009 playoff-series win over Washington in his resume.

James Neal lost, as a member of the Nashville Predators, to Matt Murray and the Pittsburgh Penguins in the 2017 Stanley Cup Finals. A tough six-game finals which nevertheless gave him his first taste of a championship series. The 2018 finals will be the second straight year he plays in one. James played for Pittsburgh from 2010/11 to 2013/14.

David Perron played just a half season (43 games) for the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2014/15. He scored 12 goals and added 10 assists, but was pretty much a non-factor in their five-game playoff loss to the New York Rangers that season.

Derek Engelland is the oldest member of the brand new expansion team in Vegas. He played for the Pens from 2009/10 to 2013/14 seasons. Though he never won a Stanley Cup, or played in the finals with them, he was a teammate of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin for five seasons. At the age of 35, he's finally in the finals.

So the Vegas Golden Knights have connections to Sid and Evgeni. Now, does this tip the odds in their favour come this Monday? We shall see. The Capitals finally got by the Penguins in six games in the Metropolitan Division Finals. It was the Caps first playoffs series win over the Pens in 24 years. Now, the Caps are back in the finals for the first time in 20 years. Alexander Ovechkin and his teammates are in uncharted waters, as of course are the Vegas Golden Knights. There will be a familiar foe in the nets, from playoff battles past. Can Vegas get back what seems like a team of destiny? Again, we shall see.


References


Dividock, Kaitlyn. “The Penguins' Cup Defense Is over, but Their Exes Are Still Playing.” SBNation.com, Sports Blog Nation, Vox Media. Web. 26 May 2018, www.sbnation.com/nhl/2018/5/26/17375620/vegas-golden-knights-former-penguins.

“Official Site of the National Hockey League.” NHL.com, The National Hockey League, www.nhl.com/. Web. 26 May. 2018.


Sports Reference LLC.  Hockey-Reference.com - Hockey Statistics and History. http://www.hockey-reference.com/. 26 May. 2018.Web.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

World Series: Did You Know?

Well, I was wrong about something earlier. Now, it's time to set the record straight.

I mentioned earlier some time back, that George Gibson was the first Canadian to appear in the Fall Classic. That is, in fact, not true. There was a switch-hitter from New Brunswick who appeared three years earlier in the World Series (1906). It should be noted, however, that Gibson was the first Canadian-born player to appear in every game in the Fall Classic. Not a cameo as you will see with Bill O'Neill.

O'Neill was on the 1906 Chicago White Sox. Known as the "Hitless Wonders," the team hit just .230 in the regular season. John hit only .248 in 1906. But still, that was better than some of his teammates.

But after playing 94 regular season games, Billy did a lot of watching in the World Series as his Chicago White Sox faced their pals across town: The Chicago Cubs!

So poor hitting wasn't about to stop 'em! The AL winners scored just 2 runs in a 2-1 win in game one, but got beaten badly, 7-1 in game three. However...In the Cubbies home park, West Side Grounds, it was the National League team that starved for hits, and our boy's cameo.

Ed Walsh, the Pale Hose starter, went the distance. Hits allowed? 2 K's? 12. For good measure, Ed even scored a run. Outside of the first inning, the Cubs were held hitless! It should be noted, the White Sox managed only 4 hits themselves off Jack Pfiester. And the game itself was scoreless through five.

And that's when the wheels came off the Cubs' chariot.

Lee Tannehill got it all started by singling to lead off. Ed Walsh, the pitcher having a great game, walked. Right fielder Ed Hahn was hit by a pitch, loading 'em up! Bill O'Neill came in to run for the right fielder.

Jack Pfiester retired the next 2 batters. But then he gave up a bases-clearing triple to George Rohe. That, of course, was the game's only scoring play.

O'Neill stayed in the game, in right. Pfiester got him to pop to third in the top of the 8th. As it turns out, neither team scored again. Bill only got to make one putout in the remaining 4 innings.

The White Sox went on to win the 1906 World Series in 6 games, as the all-Chicago Fall Classic went to the AL side of things.


References


Sports Reference LLC. Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Information. http://www.baseball-reference.com/. Web. 22 May. 2018.

Nowlin, Bill. “John O'Neill.” Society for American Baseball Research, Society for American Baseball Research, <sabr.org/bioproj/person/b6cd442a>. 22 May. 2018.

Monday, May 14, 2018

World Series: Did You Know?

Casey Stengel and Aaron Ward both hit .417, or 41666... in the 1923 Fall Classic. Tough time to determine who hit for the highest average in that World Series. Gotta go with both, I guess. Stengel was 5-12 and Ward 10-24.

Oh, the teams? Both from New York. It was, for the third year in a row, Giants vs. Yankees.

Stengel started the World Series off in dramatic fashion. His inside-the-park home run in the top of the ninth won game one at Yankee Stadium. The home team had led 3-0 early, but couldn't hold it. For his part, Ward was 2-4 at the dish. Hitting .500. But his team needed more offence.

Actually, same deal in game 2. Ward, 2-4. Yankees? 4 runs. However, the opposition only scored 2 runs, and this thing was level at 1 game each. It was Ward with a home run of his own to help the cause. The teams had alternated wins, as they had ballparks. Game 2 was played at the Polo Grounds. Unlike today where it's 2-3-2. Surprisingly, Casey Stengel, 2-3 in game 1, only saw time as a defensive replacement in centre field this game. So times at the dish for him.

In game 3 back at Yankee Stadium, Stengel and Ward were a combined 2-7. However, only one run scored this game. Guess how it was scored? Stengel, another home run.

Back at the Polo Grounds, the visitors won for the fourth time in this Fall Classic. The Yankees scored 6 runs in the top of the 2nd to put this one away, although the final score was sure a slug fest, 8-4. Aaron Ward was 2-4 for the 3rd time in the 1923 World Series, but was upstaged by Casey Stengel. Casey was a perfect 2-2, and even walked twice. For some bizzare reason, manager John McGraw pinch hit for Casey in the bottom of the ninth. That inning saw the Giants (Albeit too late) get another inside-the-park home run from Ross Young. Bill Cunningham, batting for Stengel one out later, fanned.

The first all-out rout in '23 was the pivotal game 5. The Yankees, led by Ward's fourth 2-4 game, won easily 8-1. Oddly enough, Babe Ruth didn't have an RBI. But he touched home twice (Ward didn't once despite his efforts). The home team had finally won. Stengel didn't get a hit, but collected the lone Giants' RBI.

Despite trailing 3-2, the Giants went home and appeared to have this Fall Classic sent back to the Stadium for game 7. Despite a home run by Ruth, it was 4-1 Giants after 7. In the top of the 8th, as Stengel watched helplessly from the dugout, the Yankees scored 5 runs on only 3 hits. That concluded the game's scoring.

Stengel came on to pinch hit in the bottom of the frame, but could only pop to third. Ward had just a hit to show for 4 trips to the plate. So the two didn't do much in the clincher. No matter, they'd topped everyone else in batting average over the course of the six-game World Series.


References


Enders, Eric. 100 years of the World Series. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 2005. Print.

Neft, David S., Richard M. Cohen, and Michael L. Neft. The Sports Encyclopedia: Baseball, 1992. 12th ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992. Print.

Neft, David S., and Richard M. Cohen. The World Series: Complete Play-by-play of Every Game, 1903-1989. 4th ed. New York: St. Martin's, 1990. Print.

Nemec, David et all. 20th Century Baseball Chronicle: A Year-by-year History of Major League Baseball. Collector's Edition. Lincolnwood, Ill: Publications International, 1993. Print.


Snyder, John S. World Series!: Great Moments and Dubious Achievements. San Francisco: Chronicle, 1995. Print.

Sports Reference LLC.  Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Informationhttp://www.baseball-reference.com/. Web. 14 May. 2018.

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Common Denominator: St. Louis And Las Vegas

"Expansion teams, won 8 postseason games their first year in the National Hockey League."

The great expansion of 1967/68 saw the NHL double in size from six teams to twelve. One of the new teams was the St. Louis Blues, who were coached by some chap named Scotty Bowman. They had Glenn Hall in net, plucked away from Chicago in the expansion draft.

The team itself was full of many of these castoffs, but Hall certainly was a steal. Amazingly enough, the Blues would be the third team he took all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. How long did it take Glenn to do that? Only 13 seasons. In 1961, he beat Montreal single-handily in the semi-finals and then nailed the door shut on Detroit (His old team) a round later. Just the type of goalie a new team needs.

Now, the Blues W-L-T record wasn't very good, 27-31-16. Put in perspective five of the Original Six teams (Boston, Chicago, Montreal, New York  and Toronto did better than that. Two other new teams topped it for good measure. But neither the Philadelphia Flyers or Los Angeles Kings would make the Stanley Cup finals that year.

Philadelphia, with their 31-32-11 record for...first place in the Western Conference (Home of all the newbies) got St. Louis in the first round of the playoffs. It was now three rounds to win for the Stanley Cup. Previously, it had been only two.

Red Berenson had led the Blues in scoring with just 51 points. Their team captain, btw, was none other than future legendary coach Al Arbour. Amazingly enough, he'd been to the Stanley Cup finals with three teams himself. And St. Louis would be the fourth.

It took seven games, but St. Louis had an upset. They stole it 3-1 in game 7 on the road. Minnesota was next, but this time, guess who had home ice advantage? St. Louis did. They needed it, too, as Ron Schock's double-OT winner in game seven sent the Blues into the finals against the Montreal Canadians.

Now, here's where it's not fair. An established team vs. a new team. A current greats vs. a bunch of "has beens"? St. Louis wasn't exactly the latter, but they were swept!

But then again, every game was close. One goal decided every game, in fact. Games one and three went into OT. Glenn Hall? He walked away with the playoff MVP (Conn Smythe Award). The team had nothing to be ashamed of.



50 years later, the Las Vegas Golden Knights were the one and only newbies in the NHL, which was now at 31 teams, if you can believe it. You know what team was the worst? Why the Golden Knights. Only, they didn't exactly play like that in 2017/18, did they?

They didn't.

How long did it take them to win their 27th game? Only 38 contests were needed for Las Vegas to get that. At the time, the Golden Knights were 27-9-2. Wow!

Soon, the expansion team won their 34th game of the season, a new National Hockey League record for first-year organizations. Vegas didn't stop there. When the smoke had cleared after 82 regular season games, the new kids were 51-24-7. 1st place in the Pacific. Third overall in the Western Conference. Hmmm...Where have I heard that one before?

When the playoffs started, Vegas rode a strong team effort to sweep the Los Angeles Kings in round #1. But here we go again. All four games were decided by one goal.



The San Jose Sharks was once an expansion team not that long ago. 1991/92 to be exact. Hey, Gary Bettman wasn't even around back then and the NHL was 75 years old. Not 101.

Getting back to it, no sweep here. The Sharks, coming off a sweep of their own of the Anaheim Ducks, stayed with the Knights. After losing the first game by a lopsided score of 7-0, they bounced back with some overtime magic to steal game two. The new guys were undaunted. They won an OT game of their own in the third contest, but couldn't get anything past Martin Jones in the fourth one. The 4-0 win by San Jose at home leveled this, 2-2 in games.

Here's where Las Vegas was expected to fold. But they held on to their nerves. A 4-0 lead was nearly erased, and the home team needed a Jonathan Marchessault empty net goal to prevail 5-3. The series then shifted back to San Jose and Marc Andre Fleury was through giving up goals to the Sharks. His team scored three, but Marc needed only one. The 3-0 win moved 'em into the Conference Finals. Winnipeg was up next!



So, do the wheels finally come off the chariot here? Just like it did in the third round for St. Louis 50 years ago? Could very well have. Game one went to the home team, the Jets.


If the new guys want to make it a series, Las Vegas will have to steal game two on the road. Coach Gerald Gallant will have to be a mastermind ala-Scotty Bowman. Nonetheless, years after the first expansion experiment produced the lovable Blues, the Knights are trying to write their own history. For now, they'll have to settle with a shared spot in NHL history for postseason wins by a first year expansion team.


References


Diamond, Dan. Total Stanley Cup: An Official Publication Of The National Hockey League. Toronto: Published in Canada by Total Sports Canada, 2000. Print.

McFarlane, Brian. Brian McFarlane's History Of Hockey. Sports Publishing Inc., 1997. Print.

Irvin, Dick. The Habs: An Oral History Of The Montreal Canadiens, 1940-1980. McClelland & Stewart, 1992. Print.

Maguire, Liam. What's The Score? Random House Canada, 2001. Print

“Official Site Of The National Hockey League.” NHL.com. The National Hockey League. Web. 13 May. 2018. <www.nhl.com/>.

Sports Reference LLC.  Hockey-Reference.com - Hockey Statistics and History. http://www.hockey-reference.com/. Web. 13 May. 2018.

Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 13 May. 2018. <https://en.wikipedia.org>.

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Smyly's Only Relief So Far Was In 2013, Part 2

Drew Smyly's second set of stats is no less awesome than his first set. The 21 (Cook got that number the previous year) holds more than makes up for the "only" 2 saves he recorded in 2013. His WHIP and WAR is right up there. Drew also fanned 9.6 batters per 9 innings pitched.


Stat Set 2



Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Walsh 1904 1 ? ? ? 2.60 57 4.6 1.102 0.1
                     
Griffith 1905 1 ? ? ? 1.68 46 4.1 0.954 3.3
                     
Keefe 1907 3 ? ? ? 2.50 20 3.1 1.387 2.0
        &nbnbsp;            
Chappelle 1908 0 ? ? ? 1.79 23 2.9 1.095 0.3
                     
Leever 1909 2 ? ? ? 2.83 23 3.0 1.257 -0.1
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Phillipe 1910 4 ? ? ? 2.29 30 2.2 0.986 2.0
                     
Baskette 1912 1 ? ? ? 3.18 51 4.0 1.336 2.2
                     
Crandall 1913 6 ? ? ? 2.86 42 3.9 1.290 0.5
                     
Wolfgang 1914 0 ? ? ? 1.89 50 3.8 1.073 1.8
                     
Mays 1915 7 ? ? ? 2.60 65 4.4 1.063 1.0
                     
Danforth 1917 9 ? ? ? 2.65 79 4.1 1.324 3.2
                     
Dubuc 1919 3 ? ? ? 2.66 32 2.2 1.182 0.6
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Morton 1921 1 ? ? ? 2.76 45 3.8 1.207 2.3
                     
Baumgartner 1925 3 ? ? ? 3.57 18 1.4 1.368 2.5
                     
Marberry 1926 22 ? ? ? 3.00 43 2.8 1.348 3.1
                     
Haid 1928 5 ? ? ? 2.30 21 4.0 1.064 0.4
                     
Rommel 1929 4 1 0.800 1 2.85 25 2.0 1.484 1.6
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Lindsey 1931 7 1 0.875 ? 2.77 32 3.9 1.634 1.1
                     
Quinn 1932 13 ? ? ? 2.66 24 3.5 1.383 1.1
                     
Russell 1933 13 ? ? ? 2.69 28 2.0 1.218 3.1
                     
Brown 1938 5 ? ? ? 3.80 55 3.7 1.500 0.4
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Beggs 1940 7 4 0.636 0 2.00 25 2.9 1.161 2.2
                     
Murphy 1941 15 7 0.682 0 1.98 29 3.4 1.397 2.2
                     
Adams 1943 9 2 0.818 0 2.82 46 3.0 1.254 3.0
                     
Heving 1944 10 ? ? 0 1.96 46 3.5 1.228 1.9
                     
Maltzberger 1944 12 ? ? 0 2.96 49 4.8 1.095 1.8
                     
Christopher 1947 12 2 0.857 0 2.90 33 3.7 1.277 1.4
                     
Page 1949 27 11 0.711 0 2.59 99 6.6 1.315 4.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Konstanty 1950 22 4 0.846 0 2.66 56 3.3 1.039 4.7
                     
Aloma 1951 3 1 0.750 0 1.82 25 3.2 1.096 3.2
                     
Wilhelm 1952 11 1 0.917 1 2.43 108 6.1 1.155 2.7
                     
Paige 1952 10 5 0.667 1 3.07 91 5.9 1.254 3.4
                     
Kinder 1953 27 8 0.771 4 1.85 39 3.3 1.140 4.5
                     
Mossi 1954 7 0 1.000 0 1.94 55 5.3 1.022 3.3
                     
Narleski 1955 19 2 0.905 6 3.71 94 7.6 1.281 2.5
                     
Freeman 1956 18 3 0.857 2 3.40 50 4.1 1.344 2.6
                     
Farrell 1957 10 3 0.769 0 2.38 54 5.8 1.320 2.4
                     
Zuverink 1957 9 8 0.529 0 2.48 36 2.9 1.278 2.7
                     
Hyde 1958 18 5 0.783 0 1.75 49 4.3 1.136 4.9
                     
Duren 1959 14 7 0.667 1 1.88 96 11.3 1.200 3.8
                     
Staley 1959 15 4 0.789 2 2.24 54 4.2 1.169 2.5
                     
Face 1959 10 9 0.526 1 2.70 69 6.7 1.243 3.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
McDaniel 1960 26 6 0.813 1 1.29 95 8.2 0.863 6.0
                     
Brosnan 1960 12 2 0.857 2 2.36 62 5.6 1.020 2.7
                     
Arroyo 1961 29 10 0.744 1 2.19 87 6.6 1.109 3.3
                     
Fox 1961 12 2 0.857 3 1.41 32 5.0 1.012 2.6
                     
Radatz 1963 25 3 0.893 0 1.97 162 11.0 1.096 5.7
                     
Perranoski 1963 21 8 0.724 0 1.67 75 5.2 1.202 4.5
                     
Lee 1964 19 8 0.704 1 1.51 111 7.3 1.058 4.3
                     
Ellis 1964 14 2 0.875 1 2.57 125 9.2 1.054 3.1
                     
Miller 1965 24 1 0.960 1 1.89 104 7.8 0.997 4.3
                     
Regan 1966 21 7 0.750 1 1.62 88 6.8 0.934 5.0
                     
Hoerner 1966 13 3 0.813 4 1.54 63 7.5 1.026 3.0
                     
Drabowsky 1967 12 5 0.706 3 1.60 96 9.1 0.955 3.2
                     
Abernathy 1967 28 6 0.824 1 1.27 88 7.4 0.978 6.2
                     
Wood 1968 16 5 0.762 7 1.87 74 4.2 1.006 5.4
                     
Tatum 1969 22 1 0.957 2 1.36 65 6.8 1.042 4.3
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Williams 1970 15 4 0.789 7 1.99 76 6.0 1.032 2.8
                     
McMahon 1970 19 5 0.792 0 2.96 74 7.1 1.219 3.0
                     
Sanders 1971 31 4 0.886 0 1.91 80 5.3 1.064 4.1
                     
Giusti 1972 22 5 0.815 0 1.93 54 6.5 1.058 2.3
                     
Knowles 1972 11 3 0.786 5 1.37 36 4.9 1.310 2.5
                     
Hiller 1973 38 4 0.905 0 1.44 124 8.9 1.021 8.1
                     
Borbon 1973 14 5 0.737 6 2.16 60 4.5 1.421 2.5
                     
Marshall 1974 21 12 0.636 9 2.42 143 6.2 1.186 3.1
                     
Gossage 1975 26 5 0.839 1 1.84 130 8.3 1.193 8.2
                     
Eastwick 1976 26 9 0.743 1 2.09 70 5.9 1.115 2.8
                     
Lyle 1977 26 8 0.765 1 2.17 68 4.5 1.197 3.7
                     
Sutter 1977 31 9 0.775 0 1.34 129 10.8 0.857 6.5
                     
Stanley 1978 10 5 0.667 1 2.60 38 2.2 1.242 4.1
                     
Blair 1978 28 5 0.848 2 1.97 91 8.2 1.246 4.1
                     
Tekulve 1979 31 6 0.838 8 2.79 75 5.0 1.176 3.2
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
McGraw 1980 20 5 0.800 0 1.46 75 7.3 0.921 4.7
                     
Fingers 1981 28 6 0.824 0 1.04 61 7.0 0.872 4.2
                     
Caudill 1982 26 6 0.813 0 2.35 111 10.4 1.045 4.4
                     
Reardon 1982 26 8 0.765 2 2.06 86 7.1 1.128 3.5
                     
Smith 1983 29 4 0.879 1 1.65 91 7.9 1.074 4.8
                     
Hernandez 1984 32 1 0.970 0 1.92 112 7.2 0.941 4.8
                     
Lamp 1985 2 5 0.286 8 3.32 68 5.8 1.164 1.3
                     
Eichhorn 1986 10 4 0.714 7 1.72 166 9.5 0.955 7.4
                     
Righetti 1986 46 10 0.821 0 2.45 83 7.0 1.153 3.8
                     
Henke 1987 34 8 0.810 1 2.49 128 12.3 0.926 3.3
                     
Burke 1987 18 4 0.818 5 1.19 58 5.7 0.890 4.3
                     
Henneman 1988 22 7 0.759 2 1.87 58 5.7 1.051 3.3
                     
Lancaster 1989 8 3 0.727 7 1.36 56 6.9 1.032 3.9
                     
Russell 1989 38 6 0.864 0 1.98 77 9.5 0.950 2.5
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Eckersley 1990 48 2 0.960 0 0.61 73 9.0 0.614 3.3
                     
Thigpen 1990 57 8 0.877 0 1.83 70 7.1 1.038 3.4
                     
Henry 1991 15 1 0.938 3 1.00 28 7.0 0.833 2.2
                     
Aguilera 1991 42 9 0.824 0 2.35 61 8.0 1.072 2.4
                     
Ward 1992 12 4 0.750 24 1.95 103 9.1 1.135 3.1
                     
Rojas 1992 10 1 0.909 13 1.43 70 6.3 1.043 3.9
                     
Wetteland 1993 43 1 0.977 0 1.37 113 12.0 1.008 4.2
                     
Harvey 1993 45 4 0.918 0 1.70 73 9.5 0.841 4.0
                     
Beck 1993 48 4 0.923 0 2.16 86 9.8 0.882 2.4
                     
Hoffman 1998 53 1 0.981 0 1.48 86 10.6 0.849 4.1
                     
Urbina 1998 34 4 0.895 0 1.30 94 12.2 1.010 3.2
                     
Williamson 1999 19 7 0.731 5 2.41 107 10.3 1.039 2.8
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Rhodes 2001 3 4 0.429 31 1.72 83 11.0 0.853 2.5
                     
Smoltz 2003 45 4 0.918 0 1.12 73 10.2 0.870 3.3
                     
Timlin 2005 13 7 0.650 24 2.24 59 6.6 1.320 2.9
                     
Nathan 2006 36 2 0.947 0 1.58 95 12.5 0.790 3.3
                     
Ryan 2006 38 4 0.905 1 1.37 86 10.7 0.857 3.6
                     
Putz 2007 40 2 0.952 0 1.38 82 10.3 0.698 4.0
                     
Rivera 2008 39 1 0.975 0 1.40 77 9.8 0.665 4.3
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR
                     
Bell 2010 47 3 0.940 0 1.93 86 11 1.200 1.9
                     
Aceves 2011 2 3 0.400 11 2.61 80 6.3 1.105 2.7
                     
Cook 2012 14 7 0.667 21 2.09 80 9.8 0.941 2.6
                     
Chapman 2012 38 5 0.884 6 1.51 122 15.3 0.809 3.6
                     
Johnson 2012 51 3 0.944 0 2.49 41 5.4 1.019 2.4
                     
Smyly 2013 2 4 0.333 21 2.37 81 9.6 1.039 2.6
                     
Davis 2014 3 3 0.500 33 1.00 109 13.6 0.847 3.7
                     
Rondon 2015 30 4 0.882 8 1.67 69 8.6 1.000 2.2
                     
Britton 2016 47 0 1.000 0 0.54 75 9.9 0.836 4.2
                     
Osuna 2016 36 6 0.857 0 2.68 82 10.0 0.932 2.1
                     
Brach 2016 2 5 0.286 24 2.05 92 10.5 1.038 2.5
                     
Miller 2016 12 2 0.857 25 1.45 123 14.9 0.686 3.8
                     
Robertson 2017 14 2 0.875 8 1.84 98 12.9 0.849 2.9
                     
Jansen 2017 41 1 0.976 1 1.32 109 14.4 0.746 2.9
                     
Albers 2017 2 4 0.333 14 1.62 63 9.3 0.852 2.5
                     
Pitcher Year S BS S% H ERA K K/9 WHIP WAR


Notes

Baumgartner appeared as a starter twelve times

Wolfgang and Baskette appeared as a starter eleven times.

Danforth appeared as a starter nine times.

Phillipe and Walsh appeared as a starter eight times.

Morton and Griffith appeared as a starter seven times.

Paige, Mays, Chappelle and Rommell appeared as a starter six times.

Marberry, Mossi, Lee, Ellis and Dubuc appeared as a starter five times.

Leever and Aceves appeared as a starter four times.

Russell, Stanley, Adams and Keefe appeared as a starter three times.

Brown, McDaniel, Wood, Crandall, Brosnan and Lindsey appeared as a starter two times.

Beggs, Quinn, Narleski, McGraw and Aloma appeared once as a starter.

Maltzberger, Hyde, Konstanty, Duren, Brosnan, Tekulve and Henke all wore glasses.


References


Sports Reference LLC. " Pitching Stats". Baseball-Reference.com - Major League Statistics and Information. <https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/smylydr01-pitch.shtml>. Web. 06 May. 2018.